Start Building Loyalty in Your Employee Relationships

As an employer, it’s up to you to build solid, trusting relationships with your employees, and that starts right at the beginning. An employer who respects and values their employees will earn loyalty and attract the brightest talents in their industry. And your best employees, no longer satisfied with just a paycheck, might leave and it’s increasingly expensive to replace them. Yes, most workers nowadays are just grateful to have to job, but it’s still important to value them, hear them out, and provide them with growth and development. Here are seven ways to build loyalty in your employees.

Ask for feedback

Your employees want to know that you value and respect their opinions and ideas, so take the time to build authentic relationships with them. Check-in regularly, ask how they’re doing, offer advice, and ask for their input. Support them, help them problem solve—without micromanaging, of course—and praise their successes and efforts. 

Be honest

As a manager, you’re a coach, leader, and mentor. Your job is to boost productivity and develop talent. Which requires honesty. Share information with your employees that they need to be successful. Give honest feedback so they can improve. Have those difficult conversations with them when you offer constructive criticism or confront them about a problem. Remember that if you’re honest with them and respect them, they’ll trust you and be honest with you in return.

Help them improve

Whether you have an employee who’s struggling or one who’s been charged with a challenging project, show your employees that you’re committed to their development and improvement. If you show that you have faith in your employees—enough faith to invest in their professional growth and development—they’ll be loyal to you.

Develop peer review

Establish a system where any employee can give “kudos” or “thanks” to anyone else on the team. Sometimes peer appreciation is even more meaningful than if it came from a manager. It might be something formal that’s tallied on company software, or it might be something casual, like names dropped into a jar before a weekly staff meeting. Either way, it fosters a sense of camaraderie, teamwork, and respect and can go a long way in terms of making people feel included and important.

Treat them to food

Pizza lunch, donuts in the break room, a grand fruit platter. They’re delicious ways to thank your staff. And more than that, it’s a good way to give your team the chance to socialize and strengthen their relationships. Which is more than a fun perk. These “hang out” sessions can result in productive brainstorming and problem-solving sessions. Think of it as a fun, impromptu staff meeting.

Encourage them with rewards

When your employees achieve something or simply go above and beyond with their effort, reward them with some time off, prize incentives, or public praise. A few days off for a quick vacation or an afternoon to run errands or pursue a hobby can recharge and energize your employees, preparing them to hit the ground running when they return.

Or express some thanks or congratulations on your company’s website or social media pages. A little public praise is good for the ego and inspires other employees to work hard, too.

Host team events

When your team achieves their goals, or endures a period of significant stress, reward them with an event for the whole group. It might be a picnic, catered lunch, happy hour, boat party, or another fun outing—something excited, out of the ordinary, and positive to keep everyone motivated and energized.

For more tips on motivating your employees and ensuring their loyalty, check out our website at https://www.chiefofstaffkc.com.

Blog written by Erin Greenhalgh